All Books

Lehigh University Press - Leonardo da Vinci's Sforza Monument Horse
by Diane Cole Ahl, ed.
This volume is the first book-length study of Leonardo da Vinci's Sforza Monument Horse, which was designed in the 1480s as a colossal bronze equestrian monument to Francisco Sforza, the duke of Milan, but never executed.
 
At twenty-four feet in height, the Sforza Monument would have been the largest equestrian statue ever made. During his seventeen years in Milan, Leonardo researched the...
Lehigh University Press - Writing the Past, Writing the Future
by Richard S. Albright
This book links popular British fiction from the 1790s through the 1860s to anxieties about time. The cataclysm of the French Revolution, discoveries in geology, biology, and astronomy that greatly expanded the age and size of the universe, and technological developments such as the railway and the telegraph combined to transform the experience of time and dramatize its aporetic nature¯time as inarticulable contradiction.
 
Themes of...
Lehigh University Press - Resiliency in Hostile Environments
by William L. Alexander
This book is the first published ethnography of "comunero culture" in an agricultural community in the Coquimbo region of Chile. In this unforgiving environment of limited resources and cyclical drought, the comunidades agrícolas have developed unique systems comprised of indivisible communal land, inherited land-use rights, local-level consensus building, cooperative relations of production and resource conservation, and diverse economic activities closely...
Lehigh University Press - Revelation and Revolution
by Michael G. Baylor, ed.
This book presents in English translation the basic writings of Thomas Müntzer (born before 1490, died 1525)—one of the most important leaders of the insurgents during the momentous German Peasants’ War, one of the inaugurators of a distinctive Radical Reformation, and one of Martin Luther’s first and most insightful critics from within the ranks of the evangelical reformers. Müntzer’s activities influenced the direction of the early Reformation in Germany....
 The Steelworkers' Retirement Security System A Worker-based Model for Community Investment
by Glenn Beamer

The Steelworkers' Retirement Security System: A Worker-based Model for Community Investment articulates a new model for economic security based upon steelworkers’ pension provisions and labor politics after World War II. Labor’s collective bargaining agreements created interdependent commitments that sustained jobs and stabilized communities. The evidence in ...

Lehigh University Press - Cultivating the Human Faculties
by Susan Bennett, ed.
The Irish artist, James Barry, is a major neoclassical artist of international significance. A keen exponent of the grand style of history painting, his work virtually disappeared from view following his death. His reputations was raised from obscurity in the 1980s by Robert R. Wark and David Solkin, but especially by William Pressley’s excellent biography and catalogue raisonné. This collection of essays examines in more detail Barry’s relationship with the...
by Steven Berbeco

Case Method and the Arabic Teacher: A Practical Guide compiles original case studies that address the unique challenges of teaching Arabic at the high school level. The book's engaging and accessible classroom scenarios reflect the experiences of a diverse group of Arabic teachers working in a variety of educational settings ranging from elite private schools to large public schools with low income student...

Lehigh University Press - Women, Gender, and Print Culture in Eighteenth-Century Britain
by Temma Berg, ed. and Sonia Kane, ed.

This edited collection, a tribute to the late noted eighteenth-century scholar Betty Rizzo, testifies to her influence as a researcher, writer, teacher, and mentor. The essays, written by a range of established and younger eighteenth-century specialists, expand on the themes important to Rizzo: the importance of the archive, the contributions of women writers to the canon of eighteenth-century literature and to an emerging print culture, the sometimes fraught...

Lehigh University Press - Negotiatior
by Philip J. Bigger
James B. Donovan (1916-70) was an intrepid lawyer and a skillful negotiator. In his defense of unpopular causes he has been likened to Thomas Erskine, who represented Thomas Paine during the French Revolution, and Harold Medina, who defended an accused accomplice of Nazi saboteurs during World War II. "His courage was apparent in facing down demonstrators, hecklers, racists, and pickets, and in dealing with calculating Russian agents, hostile Cuban officers,...
Lehigh University Press - Kafka's Social Discourse
by Mark E. Blum
Franz Kafka is among the most significant twentieth-century voices to examine the absurdity and terror posed for the individual by what his contemporary Max Weber termed “the iron cage” of society. Ferdinand Tönnies had defined the problem of finding community within society for Kafka and his peers in the 1887 book Gemeinschaft und Gesellschaft. Kafka took up this issue by focusing upon the “social discourse” of human relationships. In this book,...
Lehigh University Press - Wings for an Embattled China
by W. Langhorne Bond and James E. Ellis, ed.
This is the story of an aviation pioneer who developed a major airline in China in the 1930s and 1940s. W. Langhorne Bond was a Pan American executive in the days when Pan Am was achieving mastery of the skies. The book tells the story of Bond's efforts to set up and operate a fledgling airline, the China National Aviation Corporation (CNAC), while overcoming Chinese political machinations, attacks by invading Japanese forces, and changing and erratic...
The Wife of Bath in Afterlife
by Betsy Bowden

By focusing on one literary character, as interpreted in both verbal art and visual art at a point midway in time between the author’s era and our own, this study applies methodology appropriate for overcoming limitations posed by historical periodization and by isolation among academic specialities. Current trends in Chaucer scholarship call for diachronic afterlife studies like this one, sometimes termed “medievalism.” So far, however, nearly all such work by...

Lehigh University Press - Pathway to Hell
by Dennis W. Brandt
Shell shock, battle fatigue, post-traumatic stress disorder, lacking moral courage—different terms for the same mental condition and a haunting presence in wars throughout history. This is the unique story of one young Pennsylvanian, Angelo M. Crapsey, who marched off to war with a patriotic chip on his shoulder only to stagger home two years later under the crushing burden that war had imposed on him. The specter of psychological destruction has marched...
War and Occupation in China
by Edited by Charles Bright and Joseph W. Ho

A fresh eyewitness account of the Japanese invasion of mid-China in 1937-1938, these letters by an American missionary in Hangzhou provide a vividly detailed, first-hand account of the spread of war from Shanghai across the Yangzi valley and the subsequent ordeals of military occupation seen against the better-known backdrop of the Nanjing Massacre – one man’s embedded experience in one major Chinese city of one chaotic year of war.

Already 25 years in...

Lehigh University Press - A Wonderful Work of God
by Robert W. Brockway
A Wonderful Work of God: Puritanism and the Great Awakening is a survey of the American phase of the Evangelical Revival which swept Britain and her American colonies during the first half of the eighteenth century. Preceded by local revivals, such as the one stirred by Jonathan Edwards in Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1734, the Great Awakening exploded into a mass movement because of the itinerant preaching of a young Anglican priest, George...
Lehigh University Press - Poe's Pervasive Influence
by Barbara Cantalupo, ed.
The essays in this collection were originally presented as talks at the Poe Studies Association's Third International Edgar Allan Poe Conference: The Bicentennial in October 2009. All the essays in this volume deal with Poe's influence on authors from the United States and abroad; in addition, the collection also includes two examples of primary texts by contemporary authors whose work is directly related to Poe's work or life: an interview with Japanese...
Lehigh University Press - Masters of the Marketplace
by Susan Carlile, ed.
Discussions about the development of the novel often jump directly from the 1740s, when Richardson and Fielding were particularly successful, to the 1770's, when women supposedly entered the marketplace in greater numbers.The little scholarship that focuses on the British novel in the 1750s has primarily addressed male output and concluded that the genre was faltering and in danger of extinction.
 
Masters of the Marketplace is...
Lehigh University Press - Created in Our Image
by Kitti Carriker
This study takes a look at the problematic role played by the handmade doubles, the three-dimensional, physical figures such as dolls and puppets that fictional characters and craftsmen create in their own images.
 
Author Kitti Carriker maintains that, especially when created in miniature, dolls seem to appeal to the reader's fascination with, and fear of, images made in human likeness. Viewing the doll, the robot, and the miniature as...
Lehigh University Press - Gardens of a Chinese Emperor
by Victoria M. Cha-Tsu Siu and with the posthumous assistance of Kathleen L. Lodwick

The Garden of Perfect Brightness (Yuanming Yuan) in the western suburbs of a Qing capital, Beijing, was begun by the great Kangxi emperor (r. 1661-1722), expanded by his son, the Yongzheng emperor (r. 1722-1736), and brought to its greatest glory by his grandson, the Qianlong emperor (r. 1736-1796). A lover of literature and art, the Qianlong emperor sought an earthly reflection of his greatness in his Yuanming Yuan. For many years he designed...

Lehigh University Press - A Voluntary Exile
by Anthony E Clark, ed.

Western missionaries in China were challenged by something they could not have encountered in their native culture; most Westerners were Christian, and competitions in their own countries were principally denominational. Once they entered China they unwittingly became spiritual merchants who marketed Christianity as only one religion among the long-established purveyors of other religions, such as the masters of Buddhist and Daoist rites. A Voluntary Exile...

Lehigh University Press - China's Saints
by Anthony E. Clark
While previous works on the history of Christianity in China have largely centered on the scientific and philosophical areas of Catholic missions in the Middle Kingdom, China’s Saints recounts the history of Christian martyrdom, precipitated as it was by cultural antagonisms and misunderstanding. Anthony E. Clark shows that Christianity in China began and grew under circumstances similar to those during the Roman Empire, with the notable exception that...
Lehigh University Press - The Trans-Alaska Pipeline Controversy
by Peter A. Coates
In 1977 oil began to flow from the Arctic through the Trans-Alaska Pipeline (TAPS) to the ice-free port of Valdez. The project's magnitude prompted comparisons with American engineering feats of the past such as the transcontinental railroads and the Panama Canal. The proposal spawned a debate commensurate with the project's size. Congressional authorization in 1973 was preceded by a four-year controversy that was one of the most passionately fought...
Lehigh University Press - John Wesley and Marriage
by Bufford W. Coe
In this book, a Methodist minister examines the sources of John Wesley's ideas about marriage and shows how those beliefs found expression in the cleric's revision of the Anglican wedding service.
 
Author Bufford W. Coe describes the radical differences between a typical eighteenth-century wedding and a church wedding of today. He also tells the fascinating story of Wesley's romances with Sophia Hopkey and Grace Murray, based on his own...
by Christopher K. Coffman

Recent poems and fictions set in the early Americas are typically read as affirmations of cultural norms, as evidence of the impossibility of genuine engagement with the historical past, or as contentious repudiations of received histories. Inspired particularly by Mihai Spariosu’s arguments regarding literary playfulness as an opening to peace, Rewriting Early America: The Prenational Past in Postmodern Literature...

Lehigh University Press - The Myth of the Jewish Race
by Alain F Corcos
More than sixty years after the death of Hitler, the defeat of Nazism, and the horrors of the Holocaust, the concept of a Jewish race is still alive and well in the minds of too many. This book is an attempt to destroy such a concept from both a biological and historical point of view. To be a race Jews would have to have been isolated from other populations. However, they never avoided crossbreeding and converted many non-Jews. In other words, from Day One...
Lehigh University Press - Perceptions of Magic in Medieval Spanish Literature
by Jennifer M. Corry
Perceptions of Magic in Medieval Spanish Literature investigates the literature of medieval Spain to ascertain the opinions and attitudes toward magical practice held by the many writers of that period. Religious, political and social events are first explored to better understand Spain's unique historical development and its impact on authors' perceptions. This study also includes religious, legal, and medical documents from medieval Spain, as well...
by John M. Craig

Relying primarily on a narrative, chronological approach, this study examines Ku Klux Klan activities in Pennsylvania’s twenty-five western-most counties, where the state organization enjoyed greatest numerical strength. The work covers the period between the Klan’s initial appearance in the state in 1921 and its virtual disappearance by 1928, particularly the heyday of the Invisible Empire, 1923–1925. This book examines a wide variety of KKK activities, but...

Africa: What It Gave Me, What It Took from Me
by Margarethe von Eckenbrecher, Edited and Translated with Introduction by David P. Crandall, Hans-Wilhelm Kelling, and Paul E. Kerry

Africa: What It Gave Me, What It Took from Me is a memoir of an extraordinary woman who, as a newlywed, travelled with her husband to German South West Africa, a colony situated just above South African on the Atlantic coast. Here they begin a farm in a quite remote area where they raise cattle, sheep, and goats and plant large gardens on the banks of the Omaruru River. They build a...

Lehigh University Press - In Context: History and the History of Technology
by Stephen H. Cutcliffe, ed. and Robert C. Post, ed.
In Context presents fourteen essays written in honor of Melvin Kranzberg, the prime mover in founding the Society for the History of Technology and its quarterly journal Technology and Culture some three decades ago. Reflecting on the past, present, and future of the history of technology as a scholarly discipline, the contributors all share in the perception that technology cannot be understood or properly analyzed apart from its...
Lehigh University Press - New World, New Technologies, New Issues
by Stephen H. Cutcliffe, ed., Steven L. Goldman, ed., Manuel Medina, ed. and Jose Sanmartin, ed.
In this volume, fifteen scholars from the United States, Spain, Puerto Rico, and Colombia discuss the social implications of new technologies. Their essays address the cultural worlds that crystallize around technologies, the challenges to democracy that they pose, and the responsibility of modern technology for forcing a public response to new social and moral issues. Three themes define the three sections into which the volume is divided: "New Worlds," "New...
Lehigh University Press - Founding Friends
by Patricia D'Antonio
Founding Friends is a history of day-to-day life inside the Friends Asylum for the Insane in early nineteenth-century Philadelphia. It uses an extraordinarily rich data source: the daily diaries that the Asylum's lay superintendents kept between 1814 and 1850. In their diaries, these men wrote about their own and their attendant staff's work. They also write about their patients: their conditions, the moral remedies applied, the medical prescriptions...
Lehigh University Press - A World of Crisis and Progress
by Jon Thares Davidann
This book provides a fascinating account of the cultural relations between American YMCA missionaries and native Christians in Japan at the turn of the century. In addition to demonstrating clear evidence that this cross-cultural interaction produced changes on both sides of the Pacific, the author also analyzes the implications of late-nineteenth-century nationalism and imperialism for all participants. This work also contributes to an international...
Lehigh University Press - Paine, Scripture, and Authority
by Edward H. Davidson and William J. Scheick

This study discloses the intellectual context and the personal pretext of Thomas Paine's assault on religion in The Age of Reason. It uncovers adumbrations of Paine's correlation of religion and politics in his earliest work, the ways in which his controversy with Edmund Burke served as a transitional stage to his writings on Scripture, and the biblical criticism available to him as the main features of the contextual background of his struggle to...

Lehigh University Press - Transatlantic Brethren
by Hywel M. Davies
Transatlantic Brethren recreates the Atlantic community of Baptists in Britain and America by focusing on the correspondence and connections of the Rev. Samuel Jones of Pennepek, near Philadelphia. Themes such as shared news of gospel success, the development of Baptist associations, and a learned ministry made for meaningful, if not always harmonious, communication between Baptists on both sides of the Atlantic during the eighteenth century.
...
Liberty in Jane Austen’s Persuasion
by Kathryn E. Davis

Liberty in Jane Austen’s Persuasion is a meditation on Persuasion as a text in which Jane Austen, writing in the Age of Revolution, enters the conversation of her epoch. Poets, philosophers, theologians and political thinkers of the long eighteenth century, including William Cowper,...

Lehigh University Press - John Updike's Early Years
by Jack De Bellis
John Updike's Early Years first examines his family, then places him in the context of the Depression and World War II. Relying upon interviews with former classmates, the next chapters examine Updike's early life and leisure activities, his athletic ability, social leadership, intellectual prowess, comical pranks, and his experience with girls. Two chapters explore Updike's cartooning and drawing, and the last chapter explains how he modeled his...
Lehigh University Press - America's First Chaplain
by Kevin J Dellape

America’s First Chaplain is a biography of the life of Philadelphia’s Jacob Duché, the Anglican minister who offered the most famous prayer and wrote one of the most infamous letters of the American Revolution. For the prayer to open the First Continental Congress, Duché was declared a national hero and named the first chaplain to the newly independent American Congress. For the letter written to George Washington imploring the general to encourage...

Lehigh University Press - Reading and Writing
by Eileen S. DeMarco
Reading and Riding is the first in-depth study of Hachette and Company's railroad bookstore network. The Bibliothèque des Chemins de Fer, begun in 1853 as a means to market a special collection of books to train travelers, developed into France's first national chain bookstore. This analysis of the railroad bookstore network demonstrates how it transformed Hachette and Company from an academic publishing house into Europe's dominant publisher and...
Lehigh University Press - History and Refusal
by Stephen N. DoCarmo
This book examines the ways six remarkably disparate novels formulate critiques of a late-capitalist consumer culture proclaimed in recent years to be all but unassailable. Beginning with a consideration of John Gardner’s October Light and Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho—two novels demonstrating the poverty of traditional (or essentialist) right- and left-wing attacks on mass culture—the volume later turns its attention to the more...
Lehigh University Press - The Golden Ghetto
by Jaques M. Downes
This book details the life of American merchants and missionaries who lived at Canton, the only port in the Celestial Empire open to foreigners in the sixty years after the Revolution before America developed a China policy. While in China, these Americans lived isolated from Chinese society and in sybaritic, albeit celibate luxury. Nevertheless, they often made fortunes in a few years and returned home to become important figures in the rapidly developing...
Lehigh University Press - The Genesis of Methodism
by Frederick Dreyer
Methodism arose under the leadership of John Wesley in England in the eighteenth century. Its emergence is a late event in the history of Protestantism. Unlike the other major Protestant denominations, it has no direct connection with the Reformation. What its antecedents really are is a question that often divides historians. Was Wesley a man who was primarily a Dissenter and a sectarian in his inspiration or an Anglican and a churchman? Evidence can be...
Lehigh University Press - Jane Austen and the Arts
by Natasha Duquette , ed. and Elisabeth Lenckos, ed.

The essays collected in Jane Austen and the Arts; Elegance, Propriety, and Harmony examine Austen’s understanding of the arts, her aesthetic philosophy, and her role as artist. Together, they explore Austen’s connections with Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Madame de Staël, Joanna Baillie, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Mary Anne Schimmelpenninck, and other writers engaged in debates on the sensuous experience and the intellectual...

Lehigh University Press - Social Responsibility in Science, Technology, and Medicine
by Paul T. Durbin
In this book, Paul T. Durbin presents a scholarly plea for social responsibility on the part of technical professionals. Examples chosen include biomedical researchers, computer professionals, nuclear experts, and ecologists, as well as medical educators, technology literacy educators, and media professionals. Even academic philosophers are urged to shoulder social responsibilities. While the language of social responsibility is not totally lacking in...
Lehigh University Press - Critical Perspectives on Nonacademic Science and Engineering
by Paul T. Durbin
Until recently, most academic interpreters of science and technology had concentrated on abstract theorizing. For twenty years, a revolt has been going on against the earlier tradition, but not until a handful of anthropological sociologists of science turned in that direction had anyone looked at the real-life work world of scientists, engineers, and other technical workers. Critical Perspectives on Nonacademic Science and Engineering is an attempt...
Annotation in Eighteenth-Century Poetry
by Edited by Michael Edson - Contributions by Barbara M. Benedict; Thomas Van der Goten; David Hopkins; William Jones; Sandro Jung; Tom Mason; Mark A. Pedreira; Adam Rounce; Jeff Strabone; Alex Watson and Karina Williamson

Recent years have witnessed a growing fascination with the printed annotations accompanying eighteenth-century texts. Previous studies of annotation have revealed the margins as dynamic textual spaces both shaping and shaped by diverse aesthetic, historical, and political sensibilities. Yet previous studies have also been restricted to notes by or for canonical figures; they have neglected annotation’s relation to developments in reading audiences and the book...

Lehigh University Press - My Life with the Printed Circuit
by Paul Eisler and Mari Williams, ed.
My Life with the Printed Circuit is Paul Eisler's dramatic autobiography, recounting his invention and pioneering of the printed circuit in the midst of the blitz in London during World War II. The book is a behind-the-scenes report of how the invention became an important weapon against the German Luftwaffe and why it remains to this day a basic principle of modern technology in the armaments and electronics industries. This achievement and his many...
Lehigh University Press - Science at Harvard University
by Clark A. Elliot, ed. and Margaret W. Rossiter, ed.
This collection of original historical essays examines aspects of the relationship between science and the nation's oldest academic institution. This is history as viewed from the varying perspectives of a group of scholars for whom science at Harvard University is a significant component of their ongoing research. Thus, the essays are of special interest, while collectively the volume is a case study of science in an institutional setting. In conducting...
Lehigh University Press - Thaddeus William Harris
by Clark A. Elliot
Thaddeus William Harris first made his living as a physician and for many years thereafter as Harvard librarian. For six years, he also taught natural history in Harvard College―Henry David Thoreau was one of his students―but his desire for a full-time professorship was never realized. He is chiefly remembered as a naturalist and is generally considered the "founder of applied entomology" in the United States. His historical reputation is linked to his...
by Emron Esplin, editor; Margarida Vale de Gato, editor

Few, if any, U.S. writers are as important to the history of world literature as Edgar Allan Poe, and few, if any, U.S. authors owe so much of their current reputations to the process of translation. Translated Poe brings together 31 essays from 19 different national/literary traditions to demonstrate Poe’s extensive influence on world literature and thought while revealing the importance of the vehicle that delivers Poe to the world—translation.

...

Lehigh University Press - Gentlewomen and Learned Ladies
by Sarah Fatherly
This book reveals the central role that women played in creating and perpetuating an elite class in the foremost city of colonial British America. Early in the eighteenth century, as the city’s major merchant families sought to reinforce their power over both newcomer immigrants and upwardly mobile middling sorts, they endeavored to remake themselves into a colonial version of the English gentry. Between the 1730s and 1770s, upper-rank women undertook...
Lehigh University Press - Separatism, The Allies, and the Mafia
by Monte S. Finkelstein

This study examines the separatist movement's origins, its leaders and followers, the actions in which separatists engaged to establish a free Sicily, the factors that caused the movement's demise, and its legacy. This book also examines the relationship of the separatist movement to the United States, Great Britain, and the Sicilian mafia.

Appearing as a clandestine organization during World War II, the Sicilian separatist movement sought to make Sicily...

Lehigh University Press - Goeth Faust Cultural Memory
by Lorna Fitzsimmons

This book is an interdisciplinary collection of essays examining Goethe’s Faust and its derivatives in European, North American, and South American cultural contexts. It takes both a canonic and archival approach to Faust in studies of adaptations, performances, appropriations, sources, and the translation of the drama contextualized within cultural environments ranging from Gnosticism to artificial intelligence. Lorna Fitzsimmons’ introduction sets this...

Lehigh University Press - Strategies of Expertise in Technical Controversies
by Frederick Frankena

This book examines how technical expertise has been used in controversies connected with the development of wood for electric power in the United States. It makes use of a comparative structure, repeating the major case several times in the context of different conceptual frameworks. Viewing the problem from various perspectives serves to better describe and explain technical controversy and the concomitant role and impact of experts and expertise. The book...

 Cinema of the Occult: New Age, Satanism, Wicca, and Spiritualism in Film
by Carrol L. Fry

Cinema of the Occult studies filmmakers' adaptation of exiting occult religious approaches, such as New Age, Satanism, Wicca, and Spiritualism, with brief looks at paths less traveled. The occult is of special interest now when religion is so much a part of our national dialogue. While a majority of Americans report themselves to be religious or spiritual, many have deserted traditional Judeo/Christian orthodoxy in favor of new religious movements....

Lehigh University Press - Beyond History of Science
by Elizabeth Garber, ed.
Beyond History of Science is a series of papers in honor of Robert E. Schofield. The papers reflect the broad range of Schofield's scholarly interests that coincide with many historical and historiographical problems propelling research in the history of science, technology, art, and other subdisciplines of history. The papers are organized around thematic foci that both illustrate and probe these problems, and they are arranged in widening circles...
Lehigh University Press - Maxwell on Heat and Statistical Mechanics
by Elizabeth Garber, ed., Stephen G. Brush, ed. and C. W.F. Everitt, ed.
This is the third and final volume in the study and publication of James Clerk Maxwell's work in gas theory, molecules, and thermodynamics. The nineteenth-century Scottish physicist derived his ideas on thermodynamics from an interest in theories of matter, not contemporary concerns with heat engines and engineering. The manuscripts and papers presented here reveal the development of his ideas and the uniqueness of his interpretations of mechanics, the...
Lehigh University Press - Competitiveness and American Society
by Steven L. Goldman
The claim that U.S. industry is in a crisis—that it stands at a turning point in its competitiveness with foreign rivals―seems on the face of it an objective description of the prevailing state of affairs. But what does "competitiveness" mean when it is used to describe an entire industry, an economy, a nation? What is the relationship between industrial competitiveness and the personal and social value placed on competition? What are the social roots of...
Lehigh University Press - Science, Technology, and Social Justice
by Steven L. Goldman, ed.
The claim of progress has been savaged by twentieth-century intellectuals, but the idea of progress remains a prominent feature of political language, as well as of the language of scientific research and technological innovation. What are the features of Western culture and of the practices of science and technology that anchor the idea of progress in the face of more than half a century of intellectual criticism? Can Western societies be said to have...
Lehigh University Press - America Views China
by Jonathan Goldstein, ed., Jerry Israel, ed. and Hilary Conroy, ed.
American images of China have varied greatly through time, as have the way that images have reached the United States through various media. America Views China analyzes the variety of images of China from colonial times to the present, through such media as unpublished travelogues, newspaper accounts, artifacts, and photographs, as well as the more official reports of diplomats, businessmen, and missionaries. The contributors' approaches and impressions are...
Erie Railway Tourist, 1854–1886: Transporting Visual Culture
by Herbert Gottfried

This book explores how the Erie Railway, in developing a series of sophisticated travel guides, made significant contributions to nineteenth-century visual culture and shaped the social life of Americans. The Erie Railway emerged during a time in which a societal response to the production of landscape paintings and prints led to a concurrent development of tourism. The era promoted a visual culture that encouraged scenic thinking in which closely viewed scenes...

Lehigh University Press - Teletext
by Leonard R. Graziplene
In August 1981, when IBM introduced its personal computer, the United States moved further away from the Industrial Age and closer to what we commonly refer to today as the Information Age. The PC has not been solely responsible for this dramatic change. Several other new powerful electro-media technologies also made their appearance at the same time. Some of the most notable of these were videotex, teletext, cellular telephone, multimedia, and satellite...
Lehigh University Press - Literature and Technology
by Mark L. Greenberg, ed. and Lance Middle Schachterle, ed.
This collection of essays uses recent work on literature and science to establish new ways of relating literature and language theory to writings about technology (as distinguished from science). The interdisciplinary character of these essays is further enriched by drawing upon contemporary studies of the philosophy and history of technology, which provide the context for the first essay (Mitcham and Casey). Subsequent essays examine technology from many...
Lehigh University Press - Theatre in Dublin, 1745-1820
by John C. Greene
Theatre in Dublin, 1745-1820: A History, the first comprehensive history of the Dublin theatres in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, reconstructs the milieu of popular public entertainment in the city of Dublin during these seventy-five years. Synthesizing and analyzing all known surviving information about the many Dublin theatres, pleasure gardens, circuses, and concert halls, John C. Greene incorporates details of over 18,000...
Lehigh University Press - Theatre in Dublin, 1745-1820
by John C. Greene
Theatre in Dublin, 1745-1820: A History, the first comprehensive history of the Dublin theatres in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, reconstructs the milieu of popular public entertainment in the city of Dublin during these seventy-five years. Synthesizing and analyzing all known surviving information about the many Dublin theatres, pleasure gardens, circuses, and concert halls, John C. Greene cicorporates detains of over 18,000...
Lehigh University Press - Theatre in Dublin, 1745-1820
by John C Greene
Theatre in Dublin,1745–1820: A Calendar of Performances is the first comprehensive, daily compendium of more than 18,000 performances that took place in Dublin’s many professional theatres, music halls, pleasure gardens, and circus amphitheatres between Thomas Sheridan’s becoming the manager at Smock Alley Theatre in 1745 and the dissolution of the Crow Street Theatre in 1820.
 
The daily performance calendar for each of the...
Lehigh University Press - The Dublin Stage
by John C. Greene and Gladys L. H. Clark
The Dublin Stage, 1720-1745 is a comprehensive documentary history and calendar of Dublin, Ireland's theatres from 1720, the year of Joseph Ashbury's death, to 1745, when Thomas Sheridan assumed the management of the united Smock Alley/Aungier Street companies and ushered in the "Golden Age" of early Dublin theatre. During the eighteenth century, Dublin was second only to London in the number of theatres it supported and in the number and quality of...
Lehigh University Press - Theatre in Belfast, 1736-1800
by John C. Greene
Theatre in Belfast, 1736-1800 provides the first comprehensive daily record of surviving evidence relating to the nearly seven hundred theatrical performances that took place in Belfast, Ireland, from the earliest recorded staging of a play there, in 1736, through the year 1800. In the first decades, Belfast theatregoers welcomed the visits of colorful rough-and-tumble strolling companies of actors who performed in such venues as The Vaults, Mill...
The Western Delaware Indian Nation, 1730–1795
by Richard S. Grimes

During the early eighteenth century, three phratries or tribes (Turtle, Turkey, and Wolf) of Delaware Indians left their traditional homeland in the Delaware River watershed and moved west to the Allegheny Valley of western Pennsylvania and eventually across the Ohio River into the Muskingum River valley. As newcomers to the colonial American borderlands, these bands of Delawares detached themselves from their past in the east, developed a sense of common cause...

Lehigh University Press - Logic with a Probability Statistics
by Theodore Hailperin
The present study is an extension of the topic introduced in Dr. Hailperin's Sentential Probability Logic, where the usual true-false semantics for logic is replaced with one based more on probability, and where values ranging from 0 to 1 are subject to probability axioms. Moreover, as the word "sentential" in the title of that work indicates, the language there under consideration was limited to sentences constructed from atomic (not inner logical components...
Lehigh University Press - Sentential Probability Logic
by Theodore Hailperin
This study presents a logic in which probability values play a semantic role comparable to that of truth values in conventional logic. The difference comes in the semantic definition of logical consequence. It will be of interest to logicians, both philosophical and mathematical, and to investigators making use of logical inference under uncertainty, such as in operations research, risk analysis, artificial intelligence, and expert systems.
 ...
Lehigh University Press - Promised Land
by Steven Craig Harper

Focusing on The Walking Purchase as the central event in the long process of dispossessing Delawares both geographically and ethnically, Steven Harper observes the transformation of a fragile, if generally peaceful middle ground, habitable by Delawares and English on negotiable terms, to an English colony determined to possess a boundless landscape by fraud and force.

Months after King Charles II promised William Penn a tract of American land, Delawares...

Lehigh University Press - Zen and the White Whale
by Daniel Herman

In Moby-Dick’s wide philosophical musings and central narrative arch, Daniel Herman finds a philosophy very closely aligned specifically with the original teachings of Zen Buddhism. In exploring the likelihood of this hitherto undiscovered influence, Herman looks at works Melville is either known to have read or that there is a...

Lehigh University Press - Lee de Forest and the Fatherhood of Radio
by James A. Hijiya
This book is not so much an analysis of de Forest's contribution to technology as it is a chronicle of his spiritual quest. Lee de Forest was an important inventor, and this biography attempts to explain what moved him to become one. It tries to show how—in a universe from which deity has seemingly disappeared.de Forest's devotion to invention was part of his search for a new light. The book is not a study in the history of technology but in the history of...
Lehigh University Press - Science, Technology and Latin American Narrative in the Twentieth Century and Beyon
by Jerry Hoeg
Beginning with the scientific travelers and Travelogues of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, this book traces the relations between the discourse of science and the discourse of literature through the influence of the human sciences in the first half of the twentieth century, and on to that of the communication and information sciences, including the new multimedia technologies, in the second half of our century. Throughout, the images of scientists,...
Lehigh University Press - Of the Human Heart
by Edward R. Hogan
Benjamin Peirce was one of the leading American scientists of the nineteenth century. This book tells the story of Peirce's life, but goes well beyond the biography of a mathematician. It includes information on the development of science and the emergence of colleges and universities in the United States during Peirce's adult life. It also deals with contemporary attitudes toward race and feminism, which form a contribution to social history. The author...
Lehigh University Press - Making African Christianity
by Robert J. Houle
In Making African Christianity author Robert J. Houle argues that Africans successfully naturalized Christianity. This book examines the long history of the faith among colonial Zulu Christians (known as amakholwa) in what would become South Africa.
 
As it has become clear that Africans are not discarding Christianity, a number of scholars have taken up the challenge of understanding why this is the case and how we got...
Lehigh University Press - Francis Johnson (1792-1844)
by Charles K. Jones
This book examines the rich cultural and social life of post-Revolutionary War Philadelphia, where Francis Johnson (1792- 1844), a free black musician, impressed his own particular genius for innovation, composition, and performance onto the established musical traditions of the day. At a time of relative racial tolerance in Philadelphia, Johnson and his music achieved unsurpassed acclaim.
 
For over twenty-five years, author Charles K....
James Thomson's The Seasons, Print Culture, and Visual Interpretation, 1730–1842
by Sandro Jung

Drawing on the methods of textual and reception studies, book history, print culture research, and visual culture, this interdisciplinary study of James Thomson’s The Seasons (1730) understands the text as marketable commodity and symbolic capital which throughout its extended affective presence in the marketplace for printed literary editions shaped reading habits. At the...

The Publishing and Marketing of Illustrated Literature in Scotland, 1760–1825
by Sandro Jung

A ground-breaking contribution to the economic and cultural history of the eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century publishing of illustrated belles lettres in Scotland, the book offers detailed accounts of numerous agents of prints (booksellers, printers, designers, engravers) and their involvement in the making and marketing of illustrated editions. It examines the ways in which the makers of...

The Genres of Thomson’s The Seasons
by Edited by Sandro Jung and Kwinten Van De Walle with Contributions by Carson Bergstrom; Sandro Jung; Christopher R. Miller; John D. Morillo; Kate Parker; Juan Christian Pellicer; Alfred Sjödin; Tess Somervell; Kwinten Van De Walle and Thomas Van der Goten

Critics since the eighteenth century have puzzled over the form of James Thomson’s composite long poem, The Seasons (1730, 1744, 1746), its generically hybrid make-up, and its relationship to established genres both Classical and modern. The textual condition of the work is complicated by the fact that it started as a stand-alone poem, Winter (1726),...

Lehigh University Press - The Fragmentary Poetic
by Sandro Jung
The Fragmentary Poetic: Eighteenth-Century Uses of an Experimental Mode is the first study of the mode of the fragmentary in eighteenth-century poetry. Revisiting traditional literary historiography, it offers a fresh account of the "Pindaric" impulse, a mode informing deliberate fragmentation. It distinguishes itself from the work of Thomas McFarland, Marjorie Levinson (on the Romantic fragment poem), and Elizabeth Wanning Harries (on the prose...
Lehigh University Press - Bettymania and the Birth of Celebrity Culture
by Jeffrey Kahan
In 1804, a kind of madness descended upon Britain. A thirteen-year-old boy, William-Henry West Betty, arrived and, in a seeming instant, took Ireland, Scotland, and England by storm. Crowds were so intent upon securing tickets for Betty's performances that officers were called out to stop rioters in the streets. Like the groupies who would a century and a half later mob Elvis or The Beatles, fans raved and regularly fainted when near "the divine Master Betty...
Lehigh University Press - Reforging Shakespeare
by Jeffrey Kahan
Reforging Shakespeare: The Story of a Theatrical Scandal charts the bizarre but true story of William-Henry Ireland, a 17-year-old boy who fooled the academic and theatrical world with his Shakespeare forgeries. At first the forgeries were mundane: legal papers, promissory notes, mortgage deeds, but as each was unquestioningly validated, Ireland grew more bold and bizarre. He "found" Shakespeares lost poems, significantly different versions of Hamlet...
Lehigh University Press - Arda Reconstructed
by Douglas Charles Kane
In Arda Reconstructed: The Creation of the Published Silmarillion, Douglas C. Kane reveals a tapestry woven by Christopher Tolkien from different portions of his father’s work that is often quite mind-boggling, with inserts that seemed initially to have been editorial inventions shown to have come from some remote portion of Tolkien’s vast body of work. He demonstrates how material that was written over the course of more than thirty years was merged...
Lehigh University Press - A Protestant Church in Communist China
by John Craig William Keating
Freedom of religious belief is guaranteed under the constitution of the People's Republic of China, but the degree to which this freedom is able to be exercised remains a highly controversial issue. Much scholarly attention has been given to persecuted underground groups such as Falun, but one area that remains largely unexplored is the relationship between officially registered churches and the communist government. This study investigates the history of one...
Anthracite's Demise and the Post-Coal Economy of Northeastern Pennsylvania
by Thomas Keil and Jacqueline M. Keil

Examining the anthracite coal trade's emergence and legacy in the five counties that constituted the core of the industry, the authors explain the split in the modes of production between entrepreneurial production and corporate production and the consequences of each for the two major anthracite regions. This book argues that the initial conditions in which the anthracite industry developed led to differences in the way workers organized and protested working...

Lehigh University Press - The Wold Turned Upside Down
by Michael V. Kennedy, ed. and William G. Shade, ed.
The World Turned Upside-Down is based on a series of Lawrence Henry Gipson lectures presented at Lehigh University from the late 1980s through the early 1990s. A collection of essays by a veritable Who's Who of scholars, The World Turned Upside-Down covers a broad spectrum of American history, following both the inspiration and the vision of Professor Gipson, who saw American history as part of the panorama of world history, not isolated in...
Fiddled out of Reason
by John William Knapp

Fiddled out of Reason is a study of several poems spanning the life and career of Joseph Addison, who, along with John Dryden, Alexander Pope, Ambrose Philips,...

Lehigh University Press - Sentenced to Remember
by William Kornbluth and Carl Calendar, ed.
Sentenced to Remember is a memoir by William Kornbluth, a Polish Jew who grew up in the city of Tarnow, survived four concentration camps, and emigrated to America, where he lives today in retirement, lecturing and writing. He and his two brothers, Simon and Natan, are one of the few cases of three brothers surviving together in four successive death camps.
 
This book is not just the story of the Holocaust as told through the...
Lehigh University Press - Clean Politics, Clean Streams
by Franklin L. Kury
In this legislative autobiography Franklin L. Kury tells the story about his election to the House of Representatives, and later the Senate, against the senior Republican in the House an entrenched patronage organization. The only Democrat from his district to serve in the House or Senate since the Roosevelt landslide in 1936, Kury was instrumental in enacting significant legislation. His contributions included the environmental amendment to the state...
Lehigh University Press - Bach for a Hundred Years
by Paul S. Larson
This is an account of the actions taken by the residents of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania to create a local amateur society singing the music of J. S. Bach and to develop it into a choir of international importance. Singers, instrumentalists, industrialists, academicians, bankers, and churches acted in community to found and perpetuate a group devoted to sharing the music of Bach locally, nationally, and internationally. While The Bach Choir of Bethlehem performs...
Lehigh University Press - An American Musical Dynasty
by Paul Larson
For one hundred years, Peter, Theodore, and J. Fred. Wolle formed an American musical dynasty. While each musician was rooted in the Moravian musical tradition, particularly through the innovations of The Bach Choir of Bethlehem, their influence extended beyond the Moravian Church and became a major force in Bach performance in America. The early characterization of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, as the American Bayreuth remains an apt one to this day.
...
A Search for Meaning in Victorian Religion: The Spiritual Journey and Esoteric Teachings of Charles Carleton Massey
by Jeffrey D. Lavoie

Christian mystic, astrologer, and spiritualist, Charles Carleton Massey (1838–1905) underwent an eclectic spiritual journey that resulted in a series of articles, letters, and booklets that have largely been neglected by modern society. Massey was a child of privilege formally trained as a barrister of law at the Westminster School and the son of the English Minister of Finance for India. He devoted his life to solving the metaphysical mysteries of existence...

Lehigh University Press - Engendered Death
by Joseph W. Laythe
Engendered Death: Pennsylvania Women Who Kill is an historical and interdisciplinary study of women who kill in Pennsylvania from the 18th century to the present. It is not an examination of what motivates women to kill, although the reader may deduce that from the case studies included. Instead, it is an examination of how society perceives women who kill and how the gender-lens is applied to them throughout the legal process in the media and in the...
Lehigh University Press - Dead Masters
by Anthony W. Lee
Dead Masters: Mentoring and Intertextuality in Samuel Johnson examines the dual issues of mentoring and intertextuality as an integrated phenomenon. Through a series of fresh and novel readings of Johnsonian and Boswellian texts, the book offers insight not only into these two issues, but further advances our awareness of the formal complexities of Johnson’s writings and the psychological substratum from which they issue.
 ...
Lehigh University Press - Self, Community, World
by Heikki Lempa, ed. and Paul Peucker, ed.
This book traces Moravian educational ideas and practices in the eighteenth century. A transnational fellowship rather than a nation state, the Moravians had established themselves by the early 1740s as an Atlantic community under the leadership of a German count, Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf. This cosmopolitanism, paralleled only in the aristocratic culture and the expanding network of masonic lodges, became a natural, self-evident experience of the...
Lehigh University Press - Adalbert Ortiz
by Marvin A. Lewis

Pablo Adalberto Ortiz Quiñones (1914–2002) was one of the most gifted writers in Ecuador and all of Latin America. Yet outside of Ecuador and amongst Afro-Hispanic literature scholars in the United States, little critical attention has been given to this pioneer whose multi-genre contributions spanned decades. In his writings, Ortiz explores some of the defining social issues in the...

Lehigh University Press - Revelation
by Stan A. Lindsay
Rather than challenge the biblical scholarship of the past century, this study simply accepts the minority position of scholars in dating the composition of Revelation. Robert M. Grant, F. F. Bruce, and others consider the early date of approximately A.D. 69 feasible. This study looks for historical referents in the events surrounding the seven-year war between Rome and the Judean state that lasted from A.D. 66 to A.D. 73. by "assuming" such a...
Lehigh University Press - Foreign Exchange
by Judith Liu

Foreign Exchange: Counterculture behind the Walls of St. Hilda’s School for Girls, 1929-1937 is the story of Yeh Yuanshuang and Dorothea Kingsley Wakeman and their experiences at the American missionary school in China. Founded in 1875, the school that would become St. Hilda’s School for Girls was intended to provide a strong Christian education for its students. Daily student-teacher interactions, however, created an environment that allowed for a...

Lehigh University Press - The Widow's Quest
by Kathleen L. Lodwick
Mrs. Clara Byers, the pregnant mother of four, was widowed in June 1924 when her husband George, A Presbyterian missionary, was murdered, in a botched kidnapping, at Kachek, in the interior of Hainan Island, off the south coast of China. The murder set off an extraterritoriality incident which quickly became a conundrum in which American, British, and Chinese officials; Mrs. Byers, her friends and relatives; and church organizations in China and America all...
Lehigh University Press - Creative Habitat Restoration
by Larry Lodwick
This electronic-book provides a comprehensive examination of the systems approach to habitat restoration. The approach includes methods for the thorough planning necessary to restore, implement, and maintain both structural and functional aspects of natural habitats on previously disturbed sites. Implementation of the plan requires not only the following the plan, but providing the logistics and adaptive management to ensure success. This book is an extended...
Lehigh University Press - Harriet Martineau
by Deborah A. Logan, ed.
Harriet Martineau (1802–1876) is one of the most prolific and well-connected Victorian writers to have fallen off the literary map in the century following her death. During a career spanning half a century, Martineau wrote over fifty didactic-fiction tales, about forty books, and well over two thousand periodical articles. Emphasizing the pervasiveness of her literary influence, most of her books underwent multiple editions and translations, while her...
Memorials of Harriet Martineau by Maria Weston Chapman
by Edited by Deborah A. Logan

Memorials of Harriet Martineau by Maria Weston Chapman was published in 1877 as volume three of Harriet Martineau’s Autobiography. While the triple-decker was a popular format of the era, the configuration of a two-volume autobiography authored by one and a one-volume biography written by another is unusual...

The Indian Ladies' Magazine, 1901–1938
by Deborah Anna Logan

This book examines the varied influences and accomplishments of the Indian Ladies’ Magazine, the first Indian magazine established and edited by an Indian woman—Kamala Satthianadhan—in English, written by women, for women. Influences include Victorian, Edwardian, and Modern literature and culture as well as traditional Indian literature and culture during the late colonial, pre-independence...

Lehigh University Press - Harriet Martinea and the Irish Question
by Deborah A. Logan, ed.
Aside from Letters from Ireland and Endowed Schools of Ireland, Harriet Martineau wrote an additional thirty-eight articles about Ireland for London’s Daily News between 1852 and 1866, plus another thirteen articles for Household Words, Atlantic Monthly, Once a Week, Westminster Review, and New York Evening Post. It is those uncollected articles that are the focus of this study and that compliment her...
Life on Muskrat Creek
by Ethel Waxham Love and J. David Love - Edited by Frances Love Froidevaux and Barbara Love

Written by Ethel Waxham Love, a Wellesley College graduate who went to Wyoming in 1905 as a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse, and her son, J. David Love, who later became an eminent geologist, Life on Muskrat Creek tells the fascinating story of a family’s day-to-day life on an isolated ranch in early twentieth-century Wyoming. Readers will be held in suspense as they learn about the family’s...

Lehigh University Press - Technique, Discourse, and Consciousness
by David Lovekin
Technique, Discourse, and Consciousness: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Jacques Ellul examines contemporary French thinker Jacques Ellul's seminal analysis of how technology manipulates and impoverishes modern thought, culture, and language. In this first book-length philosophical study, Lovekin explores Ellul's writing as both a philosophy of technology and a philosophy of culture, locating Ellul's thought in relation to G . W. F. Hegel and...
Lehigh University Press - Pioneer Chinese Christian Women
by Jessie G. Lutz, ed.
Chinese Christian women before 1919 have been largely invisible in the records of China missions and Chinese Christianity. With few exceptions we have known little about them either as individuals or as a group. In this volume the contributors’ goal is to bring to light the life and work of these pioneer Chinese Christian women. The contributors have scoured a variety of sources in order to recreate the role of early Chinese women Christians in the church and...
Lehigh University Press - Bernhard Karlgen
by N. G. D. Malmqvist
This book deals with the life and career of Bernhard Karlgren (1889-1978), whose researches in a great variety of fields, particularly the historical phonology of the Chinese language, laid the foundations for modern Western Sinology.
 
The definition of the term “Sinology” has undergone great changes since Bernhard Karlgren entered the stage a century ago. At that time the term covered research related to the language, literature,...
Lehigh University Press - Virtue, Corruption, and Self-Interest
by Richard K. Matthews, ed.
This collection of essays examines the importance of virtue, corruption, and self-interest in the contexts of different political and historic settings. The book spans historic time frames (from the Glorious Revolution through the American and French Revolutions to the present), contrasts cultures (England, British America, the United States, France, Spain and its Empire), and represents the efforts of scholars from analytically distinct disciplines (...
Poe and the Idea of Music
by Charity McAdams

Edgar Allan Poe often set the scenes of his stories and poems with music: angels have the heartstrings of lutes, spirits dance, and women speak with melodic voices. These musical ideas appear to mimic the ways other authors, particularly Romanticists, used music in their works to represent a spiritual ideal artistic realm. Music brought forth the otherworldly, and spoke to the possible transcendence of the human spirit. Yet, Poe's music differs from these...

Lehigh University Press - Life on a Mexican Ranche
by Margaret Maud McKellar and Dolores L. Latorre, ed.
This book consists of twenty-eight chapters written by Margaret Maud McKellar as articles that were sent to the Tapanui Courier, Tapanui, Otago, New Zealand, for publication at the turn of the century. The chapters relate the McKellar family's experiences in adapting to a totally new country after leaving New Zealand for Mexico in 1892.
 
David Harkness McKellar chose a ranche in Mexico named Las Rucias. Las Rucias was one of...
Lehigh University Press - Proteus Unmasked
by Trevor McNeely
This study builds on previous scholarship on the relationship of Shakespeare to the rhetorical tradition. Its claims rest on two central, closely related premises, both of which are in one sense quite conventional, but in another much more radical. The first premise is that "rhetoric," in the primary sense of that term, "the art of using language so as to persuade or influence others," in the words of the OED, is the integrating principle behind the...
Lehigh University Press - Jerome Rothenberg's Experimental Poetry and Jewish Tradition
by Christine Meilicke
This book examines the Jewish writing of the contemporary experimental poet Jerome Rothenberg. Exploring the interplay of American poetry and American Judaism, it demonstrates ways in which he contributes to the creation of an American Jewish avant-garde poetry and a contemporary Jewish diaspora identity.
 
Rothenberg's Jewish writing represents various trends in contemporary American and American Jewish writing, and in Jewish culture....
Lehigh University Press - Humanism and Style
by Clarence H. Miller and Jerry Harp, ed.
Clarence H. Miller’s Humanism and Style: Essays on Erasmus and More provides an illuminating and circumstantial engagement with the important works of two great humanists, especially their masterpieces, The Praise of Folly and Utopia. Miller shows how they were deeply influenced by the very medieval world that they rejected as they were seeking to recover vital connections to the classics and the church fathers. Miller’s essays cover a...
by Joe Moffet

Written from a literary critic’s perspective, Mysticism in Postmodernist Long Poems borrows insights from Religious Studies and critical theory to examine the role of spirituality in contemporary poetry, specifically the genre of the long poem. Descending from Whitman’s Song of Myself, the long poem is often considered the American twentieth-century equivalent of the epic poem, but unlike the epic, it carries few generic expectations aside from the...

 The Lovecraftian Poe: Essays on Influence, Reception, Interpretation, and Transformation
by Sean Moreland - Contributions by Alissa Burger; Michael Cisco; Dan Clinton; Brian Johnson; S.T. Joshi; John Langan; Murray Leeder; Juan L. Pérez de Luque; Sławomir Studniarz; Miles Tittle; Robert H. Waugh; Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock and Ben Woodard

H.P. Lovecraft, one of the twentieth century’s most important writers in the genre of horror fiction, famously referred to Edgar Allan Poe as both his “model” and his “God of Fiction.” While scholars and readers of Poe’s and Lovecraft’s work have long recognized the connection between these authors, this collection of essays is the first in-depth study to explore the complex literary relationship between Lovecraft and Poe from a variety of critical perspectives...

Lehigh University Press - Breaking New Ground
by Michael W. Mudrovic
A member of the Real Academia de la Lengua Espanola, Claudio Rodriguez (b. 1934) has attained a preeminent status in the rich tradition of Spanish poetry. During his career, he has been awarded the Premio Adonais, the Premio de la Critica, the Premio Nacional de Literatura, the Premio de Castille y Leon, and most recently the Premio Principe de Asturias and the Premio Reina Sofia, among other honors. He has achieved this renown on the basis of five...
Lehigh University Press - Mirror Mirror on the Page
by Michael W. Mudrovic
Spanish poetry written by women began to flourish in the years following the death of Francisco Franco in 1975 and continued well through the next two decades. In many instances these poets portray another female figure in the text, suggesting that the page functions as a mirror for the woman who is writing. Through an interplay of similarity and differences with the reflected image, poets use the page to "reflect" on their identity and subjectivity, and to...
Nietzche: The Meaning of Earth
by Lucas Murrey

In this book, author Lucas Murrey argues that the thinking of the modern German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche (1944–1900) is not only more grounded in antiquity than previously understood, but is also based on the Dionysian spirit of Greece which scholars have still to confront. This book demonstrates that Nietzsche’s philosophy is unique within Western thought as it retrieves the politics of a Dionysiac model and language to challenge the alienation of...

Lehigh University Press - The Ordeal of Thomas Barton
by James P. Myers
The Ordeal of Thomas Barton: Anglican Missionary in the Pennsylvania Backcountry, 1755-1780 explores the career of the Rev. Thomas Barton.  Barton's ministry uniquely illuminates life on Pennsylvania's pre-Revolutionary frontier and more generally in the colonial American backcountry.  As missionary for the Church of England in Pennsylvania's back-counties, Anglo-Irishman Barton championed the interests of the Anglican church and the proprietary of William...
Lehigh University Press - Law and Medicine
by Linda Myrsiades

Law and Medicine in Revolutionary America: Dissecting the Rush v. Cobbett Trial, 1799 offers the first deep analysis of the most important libel trial in post-revoutionary America and an approach to understanding a much-studied revolutionary figure, Benjamin Rush, in a new light as a legal subject. This libel trial faced off the new nation's most prestigious physician-patriot, Benjamin Rush, against its most popular journalist, William Cobbett, the...

Lehigh University Press - Economics and Politics of Turkish Liberalization
by Tevfik F. Nas, ed. and Mehmet Odekon, ed.
This book is composed of original essays that focus on political and institutional aspects of Turkey's 1980-90 stabilization and liberalization experience. Its primary purpose is to trace the complexities and dynamics of Turkey's unique economic and policy environments and, by taking a political economy perspective, to convey the expectations, the difficulties, and the politics of a society in transition.
 
An overview of Turkey's...
Lehigh University Press - Voltaire's Tormented Soul
by Alexander J. Nemeth
The historic giant of the Enlightenment, Voltaire, has attracted the attention of literary critics, historians, and philosophers for over two centuries. The products of his brilliant mind, collected in over seventy volumes, have been scrutinized in a plethora of literary essays, while his extraordinarily eventful life has become the subject of a score of biographies. But the roots of perplexing inconsistencies both in behavioral conduct and in some of his...
Lehigh University Press - Reading Asian Art and Artifacts
by Paul K. Nietupski, ed. and Joanf O'Mara, ed.
This book begins with the understanding that, in addition to their aesthetic qualities, Asian art and material artifacts are expressive of cultural realities and constitute a “visible language” with messages that can be read, interpreted, and analyzed. Asian art and artifacts are understood in their contexts, as “windows” into cultures, and as such can be used as powerful pedagogical tools in many academic disciplines.
 
The book...
Lehigh University Press - The Wundercammer of Lady Charlotte Guest
by Erica Obey
The Wunderkammer of Lady Charlotte Guest examines the life of a truly extraordinary Victorian woman, Lady Charlotte Guest Schreiber. Lady Charlotte learned Welsh in order to provide the first complete translation of the Mabinogion; ran her late husband's ironmongery until her eldest son attained his majority; then married a man fourteen years her junior and enjoyed a distinguished career as a collector of porcelain, playing cards, and fans. Although Lady...
Lehigh University Press - The Cost of Economic Liberalization in Turkey
by Mehmet Odekon
This book's main theme is that the neoliberal economic policies forced on developing countries by the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank serve the interests of Western industrial countries more than those of developing countries, as the post-1980 Turkish experience illustrates. Within a simple dependency-oriented framework the book presents the effects of liberalization policies in Turkey. These policies were mostly concerned with allocative...
Lehigh University Press - Body [in] Parts
by Clara Orban
Body [in] Parts: Bodies and Identity in Sade and Guibert explores the link between HervÈ Guibert, one of France's most provocative contemporary writers who died of AIDS in 1991, and the Marquis de Sade, the most notorious Enlightenment libertine. In both authors bodies lose their corporeality. They are denied a history through shifting biographies and autobiographies, then lose their physical reality in time. Bodies are objectified and mechanized...
Lehigh University Press - From Artifact to Habitat
by Gayle L. Ormiston
Gayle L. Ormiston brings together in this volume a collection of essays, by some of the most prominent figures in the current study of technology, that question and transform our understanding of technology and the pervasive role it plays in our lives. The selections presented here offer a broad array of critical positions on and approaches to the ubiquity and mediacy of technology. The contributors draw on current debates in the general field of science and...
Lehigh University Press - The Terror of Our Days
by Harriet L. Parmet
The Holocaust remains incomprehensible to the world at large and without a compelling claim on most people's lives. By contrast the term "Holocaust" occupies a central place in Jewish vocabulary, and it is kept current in American letters and film. This book reflects on and analyzes poetry by four contemporary Americans Sylvia Plath, William Heyen, Gerald Stern, and Jerome Rothenberg, none of whom directly experienced the war of annihilation directed against...
Lehigh University Press - Contested Commonwealths
by William Pencak, ed.
United States historian William Pencak here collects thirteen of his essays, written beginning in 1976. Some deal with colonial and revolutionary crowds and communities in Massachusetts―the impressment riot of 1747, the popular uprisings of the 1760s and 1770s, and Shays' Rebellion. Others discuss the popular ideology of the American Revolution as expressed in songs and almanacs, while several revisit revolutionary era statesmen George Washington, John Adams...
Lehigh University Press - Major Film Directors of the American and British Cinema
by Gene D. Phillips
Major Film Directors of the American and British Cinema tells the story of the history of cinema from the days of the silent movies to the present. Gene D. Phillips focuses on fourteen American and British directors - including Charles Chaplin and Alfred Hitchcock, the touchstones of film history - who warrant more attention than they have received in other cinema histories because of their significant achievements in the motion picture industry....
Lehigh University Press - Exiles in Hollywood
by Gene D. Phillips
This book deals with five European film directors - Fritz Lang, William Wyler, Billy Wilder, Otto Preminger, and Fred Zinnemann - who were forced into exile in the wake of the rise of Hitler, and who subsequently enriched the American motion picture industry with a reservoir of new talent that had been nurtured in Europe. Of the many European moviemakers who suggested themselves, the author has chosen those who have made enduring works that still appeal to...
Lehigh University Press - Major Film Directors of the American and British Cinema
by Gene D. Phillips
This new edition of Major Film Directors of the American and British Cinema is a revised, updated, and expanded version of the previous edition. Gene D. Phillips focuses on fourteen American and British directors to tell the story of the history of cinema from the days of silent movies to the advent of sound, color, and widescreen. Phillips has chosen those moviemakers who have made enduring works that still appeal to filmgoers today as attested by...
Lehigh University Press - Towards a Dialogue of Understandings
by Mary Ellen Pitts
In Toward a Dialogue of Understandings, Mary Ellen Pitts examines scientist Loren Eiseley's unique impact as a thinker and writers.
 
Widely admired for their poetic prose and combination of literary and scientific interests, Eiseley's texts also incorporate an epistemological quest for a dialogue of the analytical scientific method and the intuitive, synthesizing insights of literature. Epistemologically, Eiseley anticipates...
John Updike's Pennsylvania Interviews
by Edited by James Plath

Updike remains both a critical and popular success; however, because Updike asked that his personal letters not be published the only way that Updike scholars and fans can read more of the author’s candid and insightful remarks is to revisit some of the many interviews he granted—most of which are difficult to locate or obtain. Updike wrote about his home town of Reading in Berks County, Pennsylvania for much of his adult life...

Lehigh University Press - The Life and Times of Sir Goldsworthy Gurney
by Dale H. Porter
Sir Goldsworthy Gurney is often called Cornwall's "forgotten genius." As a youth, he observed Richard Trevithick invent steam locomotives, kept notes on the coastal tides, and studied the new Enlightenment science at Truro school. He became a practicing surgeon at the age of twenty, but he gave up his provincial practice in 1820 to join the "Chemical Revolution" in London. After forty years of research and invention, he suffered a paralytic stroke. Other men...
Lehigh University Press - Food for Apollo
by Dorothy T. Potter
"Food for Apollo": Cultivated Music in Antebellum Philadelphia by Dorothy T. Potter describes and evaluates the growth and scope of cultivated music in that city, from the early eighteenth century to the advent of the Civil War. In many works about dealing with American culture, discussion of music's influence is limited to a few significant performances or persons, or ignored altogether. The study of music's role in cultural history is fairly recent...
Lehigh University Press - The Films of Frankenheimer
by Gerald Pratley
This book traces the career of the maverick American director John Frankenheimer from his early days in television and his debut film, The Young Stranger in 1956, to Birdman of Alcatraz, The Manchurian Candidate, Grand Prix and The Fixer, to the most recent projects for HBO and his latest film, Ronin.
 
Author Gerald Pratley, the film critic and commentator, has assembled over the years interviews with Frankenheimer in which the director...
Lehigh University Press - Made of Shores
by Amelia Ran
This book proposes to rethink identities within contemporary Judeo-Argentinean fiction by dealing with the transforming notions of Jewishness and national identity in Argentina. It focuses on the dialogue (and confrontation) between the narrative text and the imaginary national space it questions. By reviewing the new material conditions within Argentina and its diasporic communities, this book imposes a new reflection on what Judeo-Argentinean fiction is all...
Lehigh University Press - Science, Society, and Values
by Sal Restivo
This book covers some of the major contributions Sal Restivo has made to the sociology of science over the past twenty years. His work has been guided by three agendas to develop a sociological theory of science and scientific knowledge to use the sociology of science as a vehicle for developing a sociology of objectivity and to explore the relationships between science, objectivity, and human values. He has tried in his career and, specifically, in this...
Lehigh University Press - One Woman Determined to Make a Difference
by Alice Duffy Rinehart, ed. and Anne Taylor Bronner, ed.
One Woman Determined is the biography of an early twentieth-century feminist, Madeleine Zabriskie Doty (1877-1963). It contains twelve chapters of her uncompleted autobiography supplemented by the editor's introductory chapters and continuation on Doty's accomplishments in the subsequent years 1925-63.
 
Doty was among the few early female lawyers. As a determined feminist and Enlightenment reformer she undertook some daring...
Lehigh University Press - Machiavelli Redeemed
by Robert A. Kocis
The true Machiavelli is not to be found in extremist interpretations. The fault for these misperceptions is partly his own: he spoke in provocative paradoxes to challenge sacred truths, and this makes it easy for observers to ignore the obvious. In this portrait, the obvious dominates our vision, and he emerges as a Renaissance humanist. Machiavelli defies the stereotypes of political philosophers. He was an intense man of action, bold and daring; he loved to...
Lehigh University Press - Thomas Barclay (1728-1793)
by Priscilla H. Roberts and Richard S. Roberts
This is the first-ever biography of Thomas Barclay, the first American consul to serve the United States abroad and the man who, in 1786, successfully negotiated our first treaty with an Arab, African, or Muslim nation. It is the story of an Ulster-born immigrant building his fortune as a Philadelphia merchant in international trade, then losing it as he gives priority to his adopted country's fight to gain and build on independence. It tells how, after...
Lehigh University Press - The Notorious Sir John Hill
by George Rousseau
Sir John Hill (1714-1775) was one of Georgian England's most vilified men despite having contributed prolifically to its medicine, science, and literature. Born into a humble Northamptonshire family, the son of an impecunious God-fearing Anglican minister, he started out as an apothecary, went on to collect natural objects for the great Whig lords, and became a botanist of distinction. But his scandalous behavior prevented his election to the Royal Society...
The Memoirs of Toussaint and Isaac Louverture
by Arthur F. Saint-Aubin

This book examines the memoir of Toussaint Louverture—a former slave, general in the French army, and leader of the Haitian Revolution—and the memoir of his son, Isaac.

The Revolution and its leaders have been studied and written about extensively. Until recently (2004), however, the memoir of Toussaint has received little attention—and only as a historical document. This is the first study that...

Lehigh University Press - Francesco Di Georgio
by Gustina Scaglia
A thorough work of scholarship, Gustina Scaglia's Francesco di Giorgio presents the fifteenth-century Italian artist's codex of machine and fort drawings for the Duke of Urbino (Opusculum de architectura, ca. 1470-75 in the British Museum), his sketchbook of machines (Codicetto in the Vatican), and archeological sketches in the Uffizi.
 
This heavily illustrated volume forms a typology of Francesco's drawings, forts, architecture, and...
Lehigh University Press - Two Mather Biographies
by William J. Scheick, ed.
William J. Scheick has prepared the first modern edition of Increase Mather's seventeenth-century biography of his father, Richard, and Cotton Mather's eighteenth-century biography of his father, Increase. More than merely an edition of these two fascinating and previously unavailable examples of Puritan biography, this scholarly volume includes nearly four hundred annotations. Also included is a lengthy original introduction, which discloses several hitherto...
Lehigh University Press - Cultural Semiotics, Spenser, and the Captive Woman
by Louise Schleiner
In Cultural Semiotics, Spenser and the Captive Woman, author Louise Schleiner uses concepts from A. J. Greimas to analyze The Shepheardes Calender (1579) as a discourse and as a definitive text for the Elizabethan "political unconscious," in the sense of Frederic Jameson, who also drew on Greimas. The book demonstrates sociolinguistic patterns at work in Elizabethan ideological conflicts, at a level that shows how those patterns were related to the energies...
 Out of Steam: Dieselization and American Railroads, 1920-1960
by Jeff Schramm

Out of Steam: Dieselization and American Railroads, 1920–1960 examines how and why American railroads embraced the diesel locomotive and abandoned steam. Highly regulated railroads were facing difficult business conditions from 1920 to 1960 that resulted in extensive cost cutting. Steam and diesel locomotives were capable machines but were designed, constructed, and maintained in...

by James M. Scythes

This book offers a unique firsthand account of the experiences of a teenage officer in America’s Civil War. Second Lieutenant Thomas James Howell was only seventeen years old when he received his commission to serve the 3...

Lehigh University Press - Revisioning the British Empire in the Eighteenth Century
by William G. Shade, ed.
This volume offers eleven essays on colonial British North America and the American Revolution, the field of interest that occupied Lawrence Henry Gipson, the great student of the British Empire and Pulitzer Prize winner.
 
The essays were chosen from sixty lectures given at yearly symposia during the first quarter-century of the Lawrence Henry Gipson Institute for Eighteenth-Century Studies at Lehigh University. They represent the work...
Lehigh University Press - Queer Retrosexuals
by Nishant Shahani

Queer Retrosexualities: The Politics of Reparative Return examines the retrospective logic that informs contemporary queer thinking; specifically the narrative return to the 1950s in post-1990s queer and LGBT culture in the United States. The term “Queer Retrosexuality” marks the intersection between retrospective thinking and queerness—to illustrate not only how to “queer” retrospection, but also how retrospection, in some senses can be thought of as...

Lehigh University Press - The Chinese Medical Mysteries of Kang Cheng and Shi Meiyu
by Connie A. Shemo

This is the first full-length study of the medical ministries of Kang Cheng and Shi Meiyu, who graduated from the medical school at the University of Michigan in 1896 and then ran dispensaries, hospitals, and nursing schools in China from the 1890s to the 1930s. Known in English-speaking countries as Drs. Ida Kahn and Mary Stone, they were well-known both in China and in the United States in the early twentieth century, but today have largely been forgotten....

Lehigh University Press - Burning Zeal
by Nikki Shepardson
In the chaos of the Reformation, a declaration of one's faith was not solely a religious matter, but at times a choice between life and death. Sixteenth-century Europe witnessed a renaissance of martyrdom and the rebirth of a specific rhetoric that celebrated the sacrifice, constancy, and conviction of the martyr. This rhetoric shaped and defined the experiences and worldview of the French Calvinist community.
 
Nikki Shepardson explores...
Lehigh University Press - Irrigation and Soil Salinity in the Indian Subcontinent Past and Present
by Nirmal Tej Singh
High-intensity irrigated agriculture has fed the rising world population but degraded the land resource through water logging and secondary salinization. This book expresses fears about the permanency of irrigated agriculture. In this context, the history of irrigation and accompanying soil degradation in the Indian subcontinent is unparalleled.
 
The book begins with a brief discussion of the structural history, geology, physiography,...
Lehigh University Press - B.F. Skinner and Behaviorism in American Culture
by Laurence D. Smith, ed. and William R. Woodward, ed.
This book is about the eminent behavioral scientist B. F. Skinner (1904-1990), the American culture in which he lived and worked, and the behaviorist movement that played a leading role in American psychological and social thought during the twentieth century.
 
From a base of research on laboratory animals in the 1930s, Skinner built a committed and influential following as well as a utopian movement for social reform. His radical ideas...
Lehigh University Press - Music, Women, and Pianos in Antebellum Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
by Jewel A. Smith
Music, Women, and Pianos in Antebellum Bethlehem, Pennsylvania: The Moravian Young Ladies' Seminary documents not only the academic and music curricula offered at a distinguished seminary, but the importance of piano study from a sociological viewpoint, music making in a gendered environment, and performance opportunities available to nineteenth-century women. The Seminary attracted students from prominent families on the eastern seaboard, as well as...
Lehigh University Press - The Lost Equilibrium
by Bettie M. Smolansky, ed. and Oles M. Smolansky, ed.
This anthology assesses the present state of relations between and among the United States, Russia, and a number of other key actors in the international arena following the disintegration of the USSR and the end of the bipolar world. The cold war, with all its tension and conflict, did give political leaders an organizing framework, a system in a tenuous form of equilibrium, which afforded them a relatively dependable guide to policy-making in international...
Lehigh University Press - Backcountry Crucibles
by Jean R. Soderlund, ed. and Catherine S. Parzynski, ed.
American historians have emphasized major cities as cultural and economic centers. This volume explores the vitality of cultural, economic, and political life beyond those cities. The Lehigh Valley is a place where integral events occurred, but is also an example of regional growth outside large cities. Its unique location, close enough to New York and Philadelphia to market grain, iron, coal, and steel, yet distant enough to develop its own cultural life,...
Pennsylvania Histories
by Sheldon Spear

This book offers a consciously eclectic approach to the rich history of Pennsylvania in the period from 1740 to 1950. Combining original research with syntheses of relevant work by other historians, Pennsylvania Histories seeks to appeal to both professional historians and general readers by presenting a range of significant individuals, groups, and events that are likely to be less familiar to audiences interested in the history of Pennsylvania. The...

Lehigh University Press - Daniel. J. Flood: A Biography
by Sheldon Spear
This book examines the public life of the theatrical politician with the waxed mustache and flamboyant wardrobe.  Flood’s seniority on two Appropriations subcommittees enabled him to funnel funds to Pennsylvania’s economically distressed 11th Congressional District.  Intensely interested in foreign affairs, he surpassed most of his colleagues in the strength of his anti-Communist rhetoric.  His long career ended in resignation after he was implicated in...
Lehigh University Press - Raising More Hell and Fewer Dahlias
by Autumn Stanley
This book is the first biography of nineteenth-century magazine editor and reformer Charlotte Smith. Based on years of research, and previously untapped sources, it shows both why she should be remembered and why she was forgotten.
 
Her story is quintessentially American: this daughter of Irish immigrants, despite having only a grade-school education and supporting two children alone, became a force to be reckoned with, first in...
Lehigh University Press - A Gil Vincente Bibliography 1975-1995
by C.C. Stathatos
The opulent genius of Gil Vicente, father of the Portuguese theater, continues to attract the attention of scholars. Indeed, the two decades (1975-95) covered in this bibliography witnessed an unprecedented activity in Vicentine studies. Numerous interesting contributions appeared both in book and article form, some making original critical statements of decidedly lasting value, others reevaluating accepted critical opinions. Generally, Vicente has been...
A Gil Vicente Bibliography (2005–2015)
by Constantin C. Stathatos

This is a compilation of contributions to the study of the Portuguese playwright Gil Vicente (1465–1536) which appeared between 2005 and 2015. Entries are grouped under three main headings: Editions and Adaptations, Translations, and Critical Studies. The scholarly interest in the father of the Portuguese theater continues unabated, as it can be seen in the great numbers of scholarly works, both editorial and critical, which appeared in the decade under...

The “War Scrap Book” of Matilda Joslyn Gage
by Edited by Peter Svenson - Foreword by Sally Roesch Wagner

Although she was one of the leading thinkers and writers of the women’s suffrage movement, Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826–1898) was largely written out of history. After working in collaboration with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, and after serving as president of the National Woman Suffrage Association, Gage developed increasingly radical views on feminism, religious liberty, and equality under the law. She eventually parted ways with the...

by Anne Swartz

Piano Makers in Russia in the Nineteenth Century is a richly detailed thematic study of the history of the piano in Russian society from its beginnings with the European artisans who settled in St. Petersburg in the early decades of the century through the transition to Russian-owned family firms. The piano played a defining role in the shaping of Russia’s musical culture in the nineteenth century, as artisans and entrepreneurs provided the foundation...

Lehigh University Press - Muted Voices
by Jesse S. Tatum
This book flows from a struggle to hear the muted voices of those who would be participants in the shaping of their own lives as this occurs through technology, but who have been silenced either actively or by their own reticence in the face of the eagerness of others to speak. Two ethnographic studies are presented, one of a loosely termed anti-nuclear group, the second of the "home power" movement, with its embrace of photovoltaic (solar cell), small wind,...
Faith and Slavery in the Presbyterian Diaspora
by Edited by William Harrison Taylor and Peter C. Messer

Faith and Slavery in the Presbyterian Diaspora considers how, in areas as diverse as the New Hebrides, Scotland, the United States, and East Central Africa, men’s and women’s shared Presbyterian faith conditioned their interpretations of and interactions with the institution of chattel slavery. The chapters highlight how Presbyterians’ reactions to slavery...

Lehigh University Press - Pleasing for Our Use
by Carol A. Traupman-Carr, ed.
This is a collection of eight essays, most of which were presented at a November 1995 conference dedicated to the life and works of Moravian organ builder David Tannenberg (1728-1804). The first is an introduction to Moravian musical origins, written by Director of the Moravian Music Foundation, Nola Reed Knouse. This essay provides the necessary context in which Tannenberg's work and the music of the Moravians can be considered: it is also of great benefit...
Lehigh University Press - The Rainbow Makers
by Anthony S. Travis
This is a detailed historical reinterpretation of the most remarkable science-based activity of the nineteenth century, that of inventing coal tar-based synthetic dyestuffs, and of devising new routes to dyes previously obtained from natural sources, such as roots and leaves. These pursuits upturned existing traditions in the preparation and use of dyes, and created a new, and broader, tradition in which scientific knowledge became a powerful tool in the...
Lehigh University Press - Deciphering Poe
by Alexandra Urakova, ed.
Founder of the detective genre and author of works on cryptography, Edgar Allan Poe possessed what Shawn Rosenheim called a “cryptographic imagination.” Not only was Poe’s work influenced by secret writing, it inspired future critics to search his texts for secret clues and that fostered new modes of reading. Poe’s acclaimed complexity owes as much to a long and sophisticated tradition of his interpretative reading as it does to the “undercurrent of meaning”...
Lehigh University Press - Beowuld and the Illusion of History
by John F. Vickery
Students of Beowulf have usually agreed either that the poem’s minor episodes are more or less records of incidents in Scandinavian history or at least that they entail nothing of the fabulous or monstrous. Beowulf and the Illusion of History, however, argues that just as in the main episodes of the poem, monsters are present in certain minor episodes: the Finn Episode, the briefly mentioned fight of the hero with Dæghrefn, and (possibly)...
Genesis B and the Comedic Imperative
by John F. Vickrey

Readers of Old English would generally agree that the poem Genesis B, a translation into Old English of an Old Saxon (that is, continental) retelling of the story of the Fall, is a vigorous and moving narrative. They would disagree, however, as to the meaning of the poem. Some hold that it reflects an orthodox Christian viewpoint and others claim that it assumes a distinctly unorthodox position in portraying Adam and Eve as not morally culpable in...

Lehigh University Press - A Financial-Agency Analysis of Privatization
by John S. Walker and Geraldo M. Vasconcellos
This monograph analyzes two important questions that arise during the privatization of a state-owned enterprise: who should the chief executive officer be, and what financial contract should be offered to the CEO?
 
Immediately after a state-owned enterprise is sold, the chief executive officer's role becomes more critical as the enterprise takes measures to adjust to new ownership. It is at this point in a state-owned enterprise's...
Lehigh University Press - Annie Dillard and the World Made Flesh
by Colleen Warren
Annie Dillard and the Word Made Flesh engages two of Dillard's most defining characteristics: her belief in the power of language and her Christian faith. Though Dillard's spiritual belief is arguably the most intrinsic aspect of her writings, until now, no full-length examination of her beliefs has ever been undertaken. As a writer, Dillard particularly identifies with Christ's designation as the Word. This incarnational concept of language has four...
Lehigh University Press - Not for Filthy Lucre's Sake
by Daniel J. Weeks
The late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries were tumultuous times for New Jersey. The settlers in East New Jersey rose in violent opposition to the proprietary government of the province. Antiproprietary agitators, including Richard Saltar, defied the authority of the province courts, often forcibly breaking up the proceedings and physically assaulting the judges. Daniel J. Weeks reveals that the antiproprietary movement was more than a spontaneous...
Gateways to Empire
by Daniel J. Weeks
 
In Gateways to Empire: Quebec and New Amsterdam to 1664,...
Lehigh University Press - A Literary History of New England
by Perry D. Westbrook
Harriet Beecher Stowe once described her native New England as the "seedbed" of the nation, referring both to the westward migration of New Englanders and to the transplanting of New England cultural, political, and religious institutions into the new territories. In examining the literary expression of New England from 1620 to the mid-twentieth century, Perry D. Westbrook presents in effect a history of ideas. The evolution of religious thought and belief...
Lehigh University Press - History of the Aberdites
by Christoph Martin Wieland, Translated with Introduction and Annotations by Max Dufner
Christoph Martin Wieland's comic novel History of the Abderites (1774-81) is, in its author's own words, a "work that was written to entertain all intelligent people and to admonish and chastise all fools." It is thus a part of that tradition in European literature that includes Sebastian Brant's The Ship of Fools (1494) and the Praise of Folly (1509) by Erasmus. The target of Wieland's wit and humor is the provinciality, lack of taste,...
Lehigh University Press - Beyond Belief
by Christie Sample Wilson
Beyond Belief: Surviving the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes presents a demographic study of the behaviors of Protestants and Catholics in a town in southeastern France between 1650 and 1715. The Protestants in Loriol did not endure the full array of horrors experienced by so many French Protestants and survived pressure to convert until the Revocation itself. The entire community managed to minimize the interference of the crown and the Catholic...
Lehigh University Press - The Life of Pennsylvania Governor George M. Leader
by Kenneth C. Wolensky and Governor George M. Leader
The Life of Pennsylvania Governor George M. Leader tells the story of George Michael Leader who, at 36, was the second youngest governor ever elected to the office and served from 1955 to 1959. His chances of being elected were tenuous at best: Democrats never fared well in pursuit of the Governor's Office in the Keystone State. His election was an upset. Republican Party stalwarts were stunned at the tally in Leader's favor. And, his election...
Anglo-German Dramatic and Poetic Encounters
by Edited by Michael Wood and Sandro Jung

Focusing on particular cases of Anglo-German exchange in the period known as the Sattelzeit (1750-1850), this volume of essays explores how drama and poetry played a central role in the development of British and German literary cultures. With increased numbers of people studying foreign languages, engaging in translation work, and traveling between Britain and Germany, the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries gave rise to...

Lehigh University Press - A Quaker Goes to Spain
by H. L. Dufour Woolfley
In the summer of 1813, as war with Britain intensified, President James Madison secretly dispatched an envoy to the Regency government of Spain with the urgent goal of thwarting a feared British bid to use Spanish Florida as a base from which to attack the United States, and with the further hope of acquiring that territory for America. The man Madison sent to pursue those challenging tasks was Anthony Morris, a friend of Dolley Madison's from their youth in...
Lehigh University Press - Thew New American Poetry
by John R. Woznicki, ed.
The New American Poetry: Fifty Years Later is a collection of critical essays on Donald Allen’s 1960 seminal anthology, The New American Poetry, an anthology that Marjorie Perloff once called “the fountainhead of radical American poetics.”
 
The New American Poetry is referred to in every literary history of post-World War II American poetry. Allen’s anthology has reached its fiftieth anniversary, providing a...
 The Annotated We: A New Translation of Evgeny Zamiatin’s Novel
by Vladimir Wozniuk

The Annotated We: A New Translation of Evgeny Zamiatin’s Novel represents the first fully annotated translation of Evgeny Zamiatin’s classic novel in English. Generally recognized as the first modern anti-utopian novel, Zamiatin’s We has puzzled scholars and critics alike, for it is both serious and playful, full of games. Long considered to be enigmatic, it stands out as unique among his works, and its importance is beyond doubt, for...

Lehigh University Press - The Nightmare of History
by Helen Wussow
The Nightmare of History The Fictions of Virginia Woolf and D. H. Lawrence is an important attempt to show the influence of the First World War on the literary and cultural attitudes of these two seminal, yet very different, writers. It demonstrates that Wolf and Lawrence shared many perspectives about the dislocations and horrors created by war, as well as potential, although probably unachievable, cultural resurrection.
 
...
Lehigh University Press - Baptized in the Fire of Revolution
by Jun Xing
This book recounts one of the most fascinating episodes in the encounter between American and Chinese cultures in the twentieth century, the American attempt to convert the Chinese to Protestantism.
 
China has long been recognized as the largest and most important missionary field for American Protestantism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Ever since the first American missionary landed at Canton in 1830, with some...
Lehigh University Press - Lehigh University
by W. Ross Yates
W. Ross Yates has chosen for his subject a history of education in engineering, business, and related fields as they developed at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. This work is neither an official institutional history nor a call for the nostalgia of "old grads," but a scholar's summary of some major trends in education whose interweaving produced Lehigh University, with original objectives that survived good and bad fortune, good and...
Lehigh University Press - Joseph Wharton
by W. Ross Yates
W. Ross Yates's work is the first booklength biography of Joseph Wharton, pioneer industrialist. Wharton grew up in the period dominated by inventors and builders such as Cyrus McCormick, Samuel F. B. Morse, and Josiah White; matured during the years in which leadership was provided by Asa Packer, Ezra Cornell, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and Elias Howe; and aged along with Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Henry C. Frick, Edward H. Harriman, and James J. Hill...
Lehigh University Press - The Sino-American Friendship as Tradition and Challenge
by M. Cristina Zaccarini
Dr. Ailie Gale was a prototypical woman missionary who helped change Americans' traditionally uncomplimentary image of China. However, Gale's and other women missionaries' writings remain largely unexamined by scholars who wish to explore Americans' conceptions of the "special friendship" between China and America in the decades of the twentieth century leading to World War II. To understand the historical context of Gale's letters, Professor Zaccarini...
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